Category Archives: Improve Our Health

Dr. Rhonda K. Miller Awarded 2016 American Society of Animal Science Meats Research Award | Animal Science

Contact: Kim Schoonmaker, 217-356-9050 ext. 4, kims@asas.org Dr. Rhonda K. Miller has been named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Meats Research Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting this week in Salt Lake City, Utah. Dr. Miller grew up on a livestock/crop operation in Holyoke, CO and earned her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from Colorado State University. She conducted her Ph.D. research at the U.S. Agricultural Research Service Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, NE. Dr. Miller was Director of Research… Read More →

2016 Introductory HACCP Courses and Beyond Basic Workshops announced

The 2016 dates for Introductory HACCP Course and Beyond Basics: HACCP Plan Improvement Workshop have been set. All courses are taught in the Kleberg Center on the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas by Kerri Gehring and Jeff Savell from the Department of Animal Science . Introductory HACCP Course March 9-10, 2016 August 31-September 1, 2016 November 30-December 1, 2016 Beyond Basics: HACCP Plan Improvement Workshop May 24-25, 2016 November 3-4, 2016 For more information, contact Tiffany Walsingham at 979-862-3643 or twalsingham@tamu.edu.

Marbling research shows healthy fat in beef has benefits | AgriLife Today

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Beef with reasonable marbling and juicy taste is preferred among consumers, and industry leaders continue to monitor how to consistently produce a product with these traits. A recent research article addresses the biology and biochemistry of beef marbling and its effects on production systems, carcass and fat quality. “We need fat in beef to improve the eating experience,” said Dr. Stephen Smith, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and Regents Professor in the department of animal science at Texas A&M University…. Read More →

Students participate in American Meat Science Association Student Leadership Conference

The American Meat Science Association (AMSA) Student Membership Board of Directors announced that 86 students from 13 universities attended the AMSA 2015 Student Leadership Conference in Springdale, Arkansas on March 13-14, 2015. Texas A&M University students who participated included Michael Berto, Courtney Boykin, Clay Eastwood, Hillary Henderson, Helen Kline, and Michael Yeater. Students began Friday morning, March 13, with tours of the Cryovac and a Tyson poultry processing plant. After the tours, students headed over to the Tyson Discovery Center where Tyson’s food technologists and chefs shared their… Read More →

Papers presented at ICoMST 2014 in Punta Del Este, Uruguay

Kerri Gehring, Ashley Arnold, Clay Eastwood, and Jeff Savell participated in and presented papers at the 60th International Congress of Meat Science and Technology (ICoMST), which was held in Punta Del Este, Uruguay on August 17-22, 2014. Gehring and Savell presented their papers during the oral sessions, and Arnold and Eastwood presented their papers during the poster sessions. Approximately 400 attendees from countries around the world were in Uruguay for the 60th ICoMST meetings. Here are the four papers presented at the conference: Arnold, J. L., A. N…. Read More →

2015 Introductory HACCP Courses and Beyond Basic Workshops announced

The 2015 dates for Introductory HACCP Course and Beyond Basics: HACCP Plan Improvement Workshop have been set.  All courses are taught in the Kleberg Center at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. Introductory HACCP Course April 8-9, 2015 September 2-3, 2015 December 2-3, 2015 Beyond Basics: HACCP Plan Improvement Workshop May 12-13, 2015 November 5-6, 2015 For more information, contact Tiffany Walsingham at 979-862-3643 or twalsingham@tamu.edu.

Ground beef from grass-fed and grain-fed cattle: Does it matter? « Department of Animal Science

This is an article by Dr. Stephen Smith prepared for the Department of Animal Science ANSC Monthly stating his thoughts about the healthfulness of grass- versus grain-fed beef. JWS By Stephen B. Smith, Ph.D. Regents Professor, Department of Animal Science The internet is awash in websites proclaiming the nutritional benefits of ground beef from grass-fed cattle. However, researchers in the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University have published the only two research studies that actually compared the effects of ground beef from grass-fed cattle and traditional,… Read More →

Gill provides expertise on the use of bacteriophages in China

In November, Jason Gill visited the Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences (JAAS), located in Nanjing, China. He was invited and hosted by Dr. Ran Wang, who leads a research group in the JAAS Institute of Food Safety focusing on the safety of animal-derived foods. Dr. Wang’s group has recently become interested in the use of bacteriophages – the viruses that infect bacteria – for the control and detection of pathogenic bacteria in food animal systems, and invited Dr. Gill to consult as an expert in this area. In… Read More →

Smith presents research collaborations in South Korea

Stephen B. Smith, professor in the Department of Animal Science, traveled to the Republic of Korea (South Korea) in October and visited universities and research centers to promote information and collaborative research between South Korea and Texas A&M University. He presented “Carcass and Fatty Acid Composition of Corn-fed and Yearling-fed Angus Steers” to staff at the Hanwoo Research Center and faculty, staff and graduate students at Kunkook University in Seoul, “Beef Quality Research Projects at Texas A&M University” to faculty, staff and graduate students at Daegu University, and… Read More →

Window of Acceptability: A 25-year look back

This is the 25th anniversary of one of the most important and significant contributions that Dr. H. Russell Cross and I may have ever made to the livestock and meat industries: the development of the “Window of Acceptability.” This window not only helped demonstrate the amount of fat in meat necessary for tenderness and flavor, but also helped established upper limits so that current-day dietary guidelines for fat intake could be met. The “Window of Acceptability” was part of a presentation we made on “The Role of Fat… Read More →